HOME HOME   |   ABOUT   |   CONTACT US    |   EMAIL UPDATES   |    Español    
  • Print
Text Size: A A A

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

Vaccines to Prevent Typhoid Fever

Routine typhoid vaccination is not recommended in the United States, but typhoid vaccine is recommended for certain groups of people.

Vaccine Basics

Typhoid (typhoid fever) is a serious disease. If it is not treated, it can kill up to 30% of people who get it.

Some people who get typhoid become “carriers,” who can spread the disease to others. Typhoid vaccine can prevent typhoid.

There are two vaccines to prevent typhoid. One is an inactivated (killed) vaccine gotten as a shot, and the other is live, attenuated (weakened) vaccine, which is taken orally (by mouth).

Typhoid vaccine is recommended for:

  • Travelers to parts of the world where typhoid is common (Note: typhoid vaccine is not 100% effective and is not a substitute for being careful about what you eat or drink).
  • People in close contact with a typhoid carrier.
  • Laboratory workers who work with Salmonella Typhi bacteria.

Inactivated Typhoid Vaccine (Shot)

  • Should not be given to children younger than two years old.
  • One dose provides protection. It should be given at least two weeks before travel to allow the vaccine time to work.
  • A booster dose is needed every two years for people who remain at risk.

Live Typhoid Vaccine (Oral)

  • Should not be given to children younger than six years old.
  • Four doses, given two days apart, are needed for protection. The last dose should be given at least one week before travel to allow the vaccine time to work.
  • A booster dose is needed every five years for people who remain at risk.

Either vaccine may be given at the same time as other vaccines.

About Typhoid Fever

What is Typhoid?

Typhoid (typhoid fever) is a serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi. Typhoid causes a high fever, weakness, stomach pains, headache, loss of appetite, and sometimes a rash. If it is not treated, it can kill up to 30% of people who get it.

Some people who get typhoid become “carriers,” who can spread the disease to others.

Generally, people get typhoid from contaminated food or water.

Who gets Typhoid?

Typhoid is not common in the United States, and most U.S. citizens who get the disease get it while traveling. Typhoid strikes about 21 million people a year around the world and kills about 200,000.

Take Action

Ready to get Vaccinated?

Read More about the Typhoid Vaccine: 

Going to get Vaccinated:

Travel:

  • Typhoid fever is more common in some countries than others. Find out if you should be vaccinated before you travel abroad.